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Posts from the ‘pictures of animals’ Category

Bestialities

Hide and seek

Black and … white?

Head shot approaching

The shy donkey

Are you talking to me?

Friendly beasts at Knies Kinder Zoo, Rapperswil, Switzerland.

Unexpected depths

Pictures shot at Zurich zoo, Switzerland. Click each picture to zoom in.

 

 

 

 

 

Social distancing (from humans)

Pictures shot at Zurich zoo, Switzerland. Click each picture to zoom in.

Reflections of Fear

A relaxing visit to the zoo can turn into a nightmare for a phobic …

Keraphobia, fear of horns

Ailurophobie, fear of (big) cats

Ornithophobia, fear of birds

Chronomatophobia, fear of bones (left overs from big cats)

Officinaphobia at the zoo shop

Pictures shot at Zurich zoo, Switzerland. Click each picture to zoom in.

 

The Birds

Birds and Sahara’s sand from Katzensee, Zurich, Switzerland. Click each picture to zoom in.

 

Of cuckolds and sows

Picture shot at Tierpark Arth-Goldau, Switzerland. Click each picture to zoom in.

 

 

What lives beneath

Pictures shot under the sea between Armenistis Beach and TIgania beach, Chalkidiki, Greece.  Click each picture to zoom in.

Previous episodes:

Destination: the Holy Mountain

Modern Greeks

Under Your Protection

Radial symmetries

Old and New Thessaloniki

Lines of horizon

Peeping where Hera spurted her milk

Signs

Pinned

Radial symmetries

When feeling in danger, octopuses spread out their arms, pump water through their siphon and exhibit phosphorescent pigments. Octopuses are animals with bilateral symmetry, despite these postures make them looking like radial. “My” octopus did not ink, maybe it was not so frightened after all.

Sedentary marine tube worms quickly retract their colorful bristles (visible) in their calcareous tube (not visible). Despite their exposed, radial head, they are bilateral annelids

Sea anemones are true radial animals. This anemone belongs to the Actinaria subclass

Sea urchins (Echnoidea) are true radial symmetry animals

A runaway octopus with its usual pigmentation

This sea anemone belongs to the Spirularia subclass

Sea stars (Asteroidea) are true radial animals. This specimen is crawling through a bed of peacock tail’s algae.

Pictures shot with Olympus THought1 and Huawei P30 Pro. Click each picture to zoom in.

Previous episodes:

Destination: the Holy Mountain

Modern Greeks

Under Your Protection

Shooting wildlife

Red bird, unidentified

Marmots, 2 (!)

Blu bird, unidentified

Termites, red.

Nocturnal chamois.

Animals shot in the Swiss National Park. Click each picture to zoom in

Mine is longer

The giant Anax imperator

The tall Giraffa reticulata

A scary Struthio camelus

The largest living equid: Equus grevyi

The rare Ciconia nigra

The always up standing Suricata suricatta

Pictures shot in the new Savanna area in Zoo Zurich, Switzerland. Click each picture to zoom in

 

 

 

 

 

 

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